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Events Calendar

 

current exhibitions

Gendron Jensen Series on Resurrection in Nature
Religion and Neo-medievalism in Rouault’s Miserere
Jason Salavon The Master Index
WATERMARKS An Atlas of Water and the City of Milwaukee
Kirsten Leenaars (Re)Housing the American Dream

 

October 2016

Tuesday, October 4, 11 a.m.
GROW with Marquette led by Abby Armstrong in conjunction with the exhibition Religion and Neo-medievalism in Rouault’s Miserere

Thursday, October 6, 2016, 3 p.m.
Kirsten Leenaars and Fo Wilson - Imagining America Conversation in the museum

Monday, October 10, 6 p.m. meeting, 7 p.m. dinner
Friends of the Haggerty Annual Meeting and Dinner - $40 per person
To register, call 414-288-7290 or email mary.dornfeld@marquette.edu

Thursday, October 13, 3:15 p.m.
Jason Salavon Lecure Jason Salavon - Computational Art: Data & Algorithm as a New Brush and Palette (Part of "Walk the Talk" program)

A pioneer of computational art, Jason Salavon works at the ever-changing intersection of art, culture, and technology. Using self-authored software, he creates visually arresting installations from culturally loaded, yet accessible, material: U.S. Census data, the IKEA catalog, episodes of The Simpson’s, and, in the case of The Master Index, currently on view at the Haggerty Museum of Art, the top five million most visited Wikipedia articles. Salavon will discuss his art practice, which embraces the tension between autonomous mechanical processes and the more traditional human creative process.

Wednesday, October 26, 2016, 7:30 p.m. - UWM Arts Center Lecture Hall
UWM DEPARTMENT OF ART & DESIGN: ARTISTS NOW! GUEST LECTURE SERIES
MAGGIE SASSO: ARCHIVE & ALLEGORY: TELLING STORIES WITH MATERIAL CULTURE
UWM Arts Center Lecture Hall, 2400 E. Kenwood Blvd. on the UWM campus. Information: (414) 229-6052 or arts.uwm.edu

FREE

Through fabricated archives, 2015 Nohl Fellow Maggie Sasso relates personal narratives that function as allegories. She contextualizes objects through installation and documented performance, collapsing the space between prop, artifact, and artwork. By interrogating specific objects, unpacking and twisting their meaning back on themselves, she discovers the unique stories they each hold, and the ways in which they succeed and fail in imparting their stories to us.

 

November 2016

Thursday, November 3, 6 p.m.
TALKS BY 2016 NOHL JURORS

The three jurors who will be selecting the five recipients of the Greater Milwaukee Foundation’s Mary L. Nohl Fund for Individual Artists Fellowships (2016)--JoAnne Northrup, Curatorial Director and Curator of Contemporary Art, Nevada Museum of Art, Reno; Valerie Cassel Oliver, Senior Curator at Contemporary Arts Museum Houston; and Julie Rodrigues Widholm, Director and Chief Curator, DePaul Art Museum, Chicago--will give a public talk about their institutions and curatorial interests. The talk begins at 6:30 pm and is preceded by an informal reception.

Tuesday, November 8, 6 p.m.
Director's Circle Dinner

Tuesday, November 15, 2016, 7 p.m. - UWM Union Theatre
FILM: EXPERIMENTAL TUESDAYS
BEN BALCOM: SOME IDEAS ARE LIKE SOUP AND SOME ARE LIKE GUM
UWM Union Theatre, 2200 E. Kenwood Blvd. Information: (414) 229-4070 or uniontheatre.uwm.edu

FREE

A program of films and videos made by Ben Balcom over the past three years and representing the culmination of his work as a 2015 Nohl Fellow. Balcom’s short films are little machines built for working through ideas, philosophical toys for an overcoded world. Playful and energetic, these films flutter between lyrical and structural modes while alighting on notions of perception, artifice and affect.

Wednesday, November 16, 2016, 7:30 p.m. - UWM Arts Center Lecture Hall
UWM DEPARTMENT OF ART & DESIGN: ARTISTS NOW! GUEST LECTURE SERIES
JON HORVATH: THIS IS BLISS
UWM Arts Center Lecture Hall, 2400 E. Kenwood Blvd. on the UWM Campus. Information: (414) 229-6052 or arts.uwm.edu

FREE

This Is Bliss, 2015 Nohl Fellow Jon Horvath's current multidisciplinary project, examines the vanishing roadside geography and current residents of Bliss, Idaho, a small rural town. Philosophically rooted in a broad consideration of how deeply entrenched mythologies of place (the American West) and traditional mythologies of happiness collide--and are frequently confounded--This is Bliss illuminates a location formed by a complex narrative of booms and busts, a place that reflects the long evolution of American idealism.

Thursday, November 17, 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Women & Wine Reception and Tour with hosts Claire Boles and Donna Farrell
To register, call 414-288-7290 or email mary.dornfeld@marquette.edu

 

December 2016

Thursday, December 1, 6 to 8 p.m.
Friends of the Haggerty Annual Holiday Party

Saturday, December 3, 2 to 3 p.m.
On Display dance performance with Catey Ott Thompson

Wednesday, December 14, 2016, 7 p.m. - UWM Union Theatre
FILM: LOCALLY GROWN
FRANKIE LATINA: CHINA TEST GIRLS
UWM Union Theatre, 2200 E. Kenwood Blvd. on the UWM campus. Information: (414) 229-4070 or uniontheatre.uwm.edu

FREE

2015 Nohl Fellow Frankie Latina offers a work-in-progress test screening of his latest film, China Test Girls. It features the rich palette of vibrant colors, dynamic symmetrical compositions, stylish fashions, dramatic Milwaukee locations, and preternatural attention to detail that we associate with Latina's work. China Test Girls follows an ambitious photographer as she is sucked into a labyrinth of intrigue and danger when the “wrong” camera--and its film--falls into her possession, and it climaxes in an explosion of desperate violence as the menacing antagonists stop at nothing to get that one photo that can bring a kingdom down.

Thursday, December 15, 2016, 7 p.m. - UWM Union Theatre
FILM: LOCALLY GROWN
UPSTREAM SALMON: THE WATERING HOLE and Other Works by Queer Makers
UWM Union Theatre, 2200 E. Kenwood Blvd. on the UWM campus. Information: (414) 229-4070 or uniontheatre.uwm.edu

FREE

UPSTREAM SALMON features the premiere of The Watering Hole, a short movie by 2015 Nohl Fellow Zach Hill. He shares a program that celebrates the urge to go against the flow and lay the status quo to rest with other queer makers by showcasing a variety of moving image and video works.

 

February 2017

February 2 – May 21, 2017
Look How Far We’ve Come!
Contemporary artist Jeffrey Gibson is best known for sculptures and paintings that intermingle traditional Native American art with contemporary art and culture. The Haggerty Museum of Art at Marquette University will present Look How Far We’ve Come!, a solo exhibition of Gibson’s work, from February 2 – May 21, 2017. The exhibition will include a newly-commissioned, beaded wall hanging, soundtrack, and site-specific wall painting inspired by Gibson’s research in the Native American Collections of Marquette University’s archives. Existing paintings and sculptural works from other private and institutional lenders will also be on view.

 

All programs are free, open to the public and take place at the Haggerty Museum of Art, unless otherwise noted.

Past events